Ethiopia

Reko 150g (5.3oz)

An anaerobically fermented peaberry selection from the Reko washing station in Yirgacheffe
  • A rare experimental process from the Reko washing station near the town of Yirgacheffe.
  • This peaberry selection showcases a new interpretation of the terroir of this iconic region.
  • Whole Bean Coffee - 150g.
  • Optimal brew: Filter 4-30 days | Espresso 10-60 days.
  • Release date: 2nd of March.

Expect notes of:

Cantaloupe

Honey

Pecan

Flat rate shipping

Worldwide 50 DKK ($7.9 / €6.7)
Domestic from 29 DKK

FREE SHIPPING TO 40+ COUNTRIES

On all orders above 500 DKK (€67.00 / $76.50)*

WE ONLY SHIP FRESH ROASTS

Shipping Tuesday and Thursday

Ethiopia

How coffee is grown

In Ethiopia, coffee still grows semi-wild, and in some cases completely wild. Apart from some regions of neighbouring South Sudan, Ethiopia is the only country in which coffee is found growing in this way, due to its status as the genetic birthplace of arabica coffee. This means in many regions, small producers still harvest cherries from wild coffee trees growing in high altitude humid forests, especially around Ethiopia’s famous Great Rift Valley.

There are three categories of forest coffee growing in Ethiopia, Forest Coffee (FC), Semi-Forest Coffee (SFC), and Forest Garden Coffee (FGC), with each having an increasing amount of intervention from coffee producers. Forest coffee makes up a total of approximately 60% of Ethiopia’s yearly output, so this is a hugely important method of production, and part of what makes Ethiopian coffee so unique.

Biodiversity

Throughout all of these systems, a much higher level of biodiversity is maintained than in modern coffee production in most of the rest of the world. This is partly due to the forest system, and partly down to the genetic diversity of the coffee plants themselves. There are thousands of so far uncategorised ‘heirloom’ varieties growing in Ethiopia; all descended from wild cross pollination between species derived from the original Arabica trees. This biodiversity leads to hardier coffee plants, which don’t need to be artificially fertilised. This means that 95% of coffee production in Ethiopia is organic, although most small farmers and mills can’t afford to pay for certification, so can’t label their coffee as such. The absence of monoculture in the Ethiopian coffee lands also means plants are much less susceptible to the decimating effects of diseases such as leaf rust that have ripped through other producing countries.

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Technical
Data

Wet Mill Reko
Region Yirgacheffe
Varietals Kurume Peaberry
Altitude 1850-2100 masl
Process Anaerobic
Harvest March 2018

Process
Anaerobic

The coffee is first pulped mechanically, removing most of the fruit, as with a white honey process. The parchment coffee and almost gel-like mucilage are then packed tightly into a small fermentation tank, and sealed with almost no oxygen present. As the fermentation starts to occur, carbon dioxide is produced, creating a completely anaerobic environment, and also high pressure within the tank. This affects coffee flavour in two ways. An anaerobic environment favours a very different set of fermenting bacteria and yeast, leading to a dominant lacto-fermentation. The pressure also forces coffee juices into the seed itself, adding more fermentable sugars to continue the process. The coffee is then dried with the mucilage still attached, as with a honey processed coffee. All of this adds layers of complexity to the final cup, and a very clean and juicy character, a very distinctive expression of the Altos terroir.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Chemex

Espro press

Hario V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notifed with the release of new coffees.

Click here to be notified by email when Reko 150g (5.3oz) becomes available.

Kr. 149,00




An anaerobically fermented peaberry selection from the Reko washing station in Yirgacheffe
  • A rare experimental process from the Reko washing station near the town of Yirgacheffe.
  • This peaberry selection showcases a new interpretation of the terroir of this iconic region.
  • Whole Bean Coffee - 150g.
  • Optimal brew: Filter 4-30 days | Espresso 10-60 days.
  • Release date: 2nd of March.

Expect notes of:

Cantaloupe

Honey

Pecan

Flat rate shipping

Worldwide 50 DKK ($7.9 / €6.7)
Domestic from 29 DKK

FREE SHIPPING TO 40+ COUNTRIES

On all orders above 500 DKK (€67.00 / $76.50)*

WE ONLY SHIP FRESH ROASTS

Shipping Tuesday and Thursday

Ethiopia

How coffee is grown

In Ethiopia, coffee still grows semi-wild, and in some cases completely wild. Apart from some regions of neighbouring South Sudan, Ethiopia is the only country in which coffee is found growing in this way, due to its status as the genetic birthplace of arabica coffee. This means in many regions, small producers still harvest cherries from wild coffee trees growing in high altitude humid forests, especially around Ethiopia’s famous Great Rift Valley.

There are three categories of forest coffee growing in Ethiopia, Forest Coffee (FC), Semi-Forest Coffee (SFC), and Forest Garden Coffee (FGC), with each having an increasing amount of intervention from coffee producers. Forest coffee makes up a total of approximately 60% of Ethiopia’s yearly output, so this is a hugely important method of production, and part of what makes Ethiopian coffee so unique.

Biodiversity

Throughout all of these systems, a much higher level of biodiversity is maintained than in modern coffee production in most of the rest of the world. This is partly due to the forest system, and partly down to the genetic diversity of the coffee plants themselves. There are thousands of so far uncategorised ‘heirloom’ varieties growing in Ethiopia; all descended from wild cross pollination between species derived from the original Arabica trees. This biodiversity leads to hardier coffee plants, which don’t need to be artificially fertilised. This means that 95% of coffee production in Ethiopia is organic, although most small farmers and mills can’t afford to pay for certification, so can’t label their coffee as such. The absence of monoculture in the Ethiopian coffee lands also means plants are much less susceptible to the decimating effects of diseases such as leaf rust that have ripped through other producing countries.

-->

Technical
Data

Wet Mill Reko
Region Yirgacheffe
Varietals Kurume Peaberry
Altitude 1850-2100 masl
Process Anaerobic
Harvest March 2018

Process
Anaerobic

The coffee is first pulped mechanically, removing most of the fruit, as with a white honey process. The parchment coffee and almost gel-like mucilage are then packed tightly into a small fermentation tank, and sealed with almost no oxygen present. As the fermentation starts to occur, carbon dioxide is produced, creating a completely anaerobic environment, and also high pressure within the tank. This affects coffee flavour in two ways. An anaerobic environment favours a very different set of fermenting bacteria and yeast, leading to a dominant lacto-fermentation. The pressure also forces coffee juices into the seed itself, adding more fermentable sugars to continue the process. The coffee is then dried with the mucilage still attached, as with a honey processed coffee. All of this adds layers of complexity to the final cup, and a very clean and juicy character, a very distinctive expression of the Altos terroir.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Chemex

Espro press

Hario V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notifed with the release of new coffees.

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