Gitwe Natural

Chocolate dessert with blackberry filling with a lingering sweet aftertaste of molasses.
  • The Long Miles Project coffee.
  • The project works with more than 4.500 individual coffee farmers.
  • Whole Bean Coffee - 250g (8.8oz).
  • Omni-roast (roasted for use as filter and espresso).
  • Optimal brew: Filter 4-30 days | Espresso 10-60 days.
  • Release date: 1st of May.

Expect notes of:

Chocolate

Blackberry

Molasses

Flat rate shipping

Worldwide rates $7.6 / €6.7
Denmark from 29 DKK

FREE SHIPPING TO 40+ COUNTRIES

On all orders above
500 DKK (€67.00 / $76.50)*

WE ONLY SHIP FRESH ROASTS

Shipping from the roastery
Tuesday and Thursday

Burundi

The Long Miles Project

The Long Miles Project, founded by Ben and Kristy Carlson, opened its doors in 2013 and aims to raise the bar of specialty coffees coming out of Burundi. The project works with more than 4.500 individual coffee farmers living near two central washing stations, Bukeye, opened in 2013 and Heza, from 2014. There are several reasons why producing speciality coffee in Burundi is an incredibly difficult task. There’s the incredibly unstable political situation, where government can change rules on coffee prices and production seemingly overnight, the geographical constraints, that come with being a small landlocked country attempting to export coffee by sea freight, the constant threat of military coup. But through it all the Carlson family have managed to establish themselves as producers and exporters of consistently delicious coffees, all while providing some semblance of stability to the lives of smallholder farmers that surround their two washing stations in the northern Kayanza Province, near the border with Rwanda.

Coffee production at Heza is made possible from nearly 2.000 individual farmers supplying the station with ripe cherries, several hundred of whom deliver their cherries directly to the station. Heza employs 90 locals, 60 of whom are women devoted to quality control in the final cherry selection process. Heza also helps local farmers by supplying trees from a coffee tree nursery with over 15.000 seedlings and the intention is to plant these all over the war-torn Burundi countryside in years to come.

You can read more on the history of the project at: http://www.longmilescoffeeproject.com/history-harvests/

About

Gitwe

Long Miles split up the production of their mills by ‘hills’ or ‘collines’ in French. These are the smallest unit of separation in Burundi, like small communes, and most contain a couple of hundred smallholder farmers. We have purchased coffees grown on several of the hills in the past, and each seems to have their own distinct character. The Gitwe hill stretches from Heza washing station all the way to the main road that runs through the northern province of Kayanza. At almost every hour the hill bustles with the activity of village life. People run alongside cars with baskets full to the brim with onions and potatoes to sell. Carpenters craft planks of wood into tables in the small town’s centre. Fig trees stand tall on either side of the hill, casting a welcoming shade from the hot East African sun. An assortment of onions, sweet potato, maize, banana, cassava, beans and cabbage are grown alongside coffee in the hill’s rich soils.

Gitwe carries deep scars from its violent past. Yet, there is an unrivalled unity amongst the people here. They have worked hard to develop as a community, coming together to build schools for their children and homes for their neighbours. With the help of Anicet and Patrice, the two coffee scouts dedicated to working on the hill, they are learning best farming practices. Before the scouts, farmers weren’t aware of the harm antestia bugs – the insect linked to the potato defect - could cause to their coffee. There was no one to show them how to prune their trees or explain why it was important. They didn’t know how to mulch or fertilize their farms. e scouts’ hard work has renewed farmers’ interest in growing coffee. Gitwe farmers are now pioneering a way of irrigating their coffee by building water channels alongside their farms. These channels collect rain water, which slowly irrigates their coffee trees and other crops. This is the second year in a row we have purchased coffee from Gitwe hill, but this year we have purchased both a washed and a natural processed lot. The washed process lot has a classic acidity-forward profile, typical of Burundi, with notes of gooseberry and redcurrant. This is rounded out by a honey sweetness, and a distinct rooibos tea finish.

Technical
Data

Producer Ben Carlson
Region Heza
Altitude 2000 masl
Varietals Bourbon
Process Natural
Harvest June 2018

Process
Washed

Natural processing is the original manner in which all coffee was previously processed. The cherries are dried with the seeds (also known as beans) inside, like drying a grape into a raisin. The seeds are dried with all of their layers intact, including the coffee cherry and mucilage. The coffee cherry and mucilage are composed of sugars and alcohols, which play a role in the sweetness, acidity and overall flavour profile of the coffee. The fruit is a closed environment, which encourages natural fermentation – helping create the final flavour profile. The fruit dries onto the parchment that surrounds the seeds.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Chemex

Espro press

Hario V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notifed with the release of new coffees.

Click here to be notified by email when Gitwe Natural becomes available.

Kr. 129,00




Chocolate dessert with blackberry filling with a lingering sweet aftertaste of molasses.
  • The Long Miles Project coffee.
  • The project works with more than 4.500 individual coffee farmers.
  • Whole Bean Coffee - 250g (8.8oz).
  • Omni-roast (roasted for use as filter and espresso).
  • Optimal brew: Filter 4-30 days | Espresso 10-60 days.
  • Release date: 1st of May.

Expect notes of:

Chocolate

Blackberry

Molasses

Flat rate shipping

Worldwide rates $7.6 / €6.7
Denmark from 29 DKK

FREE SHIPPING TO 40+ COUNTRIES

On all orders above
500 DKK (€67.00 / $76.50)*

WE ONLY SHIP FRESH ROASTS

Shipping from the roastery
Tuesday and Thursday

Burundi

The Long Miles Project

The Long Miles Project, founded by Ben and Kristy Carlson, opened its doors in 2013 and aims to raise the bar of specialty coffees coming out of Burundi. The project works with more than 4.500 individual coffee farmers living near two central washing stations, Bukeye, opened in 2013 and Heza, from 2014. There are several reasons why producing speciality coffee in Burundi is an incredibly difficult task. There’s the incredibly unstable political situation, where government can change rules on coffee prices and production seemingly overnight, the geographical constraints, that come with being a small landlocked country attempting to export coffee by sea freight, the constant threat of military coup. But through it all the Carlson family have managed to establish themselves as producers and exporters of consistently delicious coffees, all while providing some semblance of stability to the lives of smallholder farmers that surround their two washing stations in the northern Kayanza Province, near the border with Rwanda.

Coffee production at Heza is made possible from nearly 2.000 individual farmers supplying the station with ripe cherries, several hundred of whom deliver their cherries directly to the station. Heza employs 90 locals, 60 of whom are women devoted to quality control in the final cherry selection process. Heza also helps local farmers by supplying trees from a coffee tree nursery with over 15.000 seedlings and the intention is to plant these all over the war-torn Burundi countryside in years to come.

You can read more on the history of the project at: http://www.longmilescoffeeproject.com/history-harvests/

About

Gitwe

Long Miles split up the production of their mills by ‘hills’ or ‘collines’ in French. These are the smallest unit of separation in Burundi, like small communes, and most contain a couple of hundred smallholder farmers. We have purchased coffees grown on several of the hills in the past, and each seems to have their own distinct character. The Gitwe hill stretches from Heza washing station all the way to the main road that runs through the northern province of Kayanza. At almost every hour the hill bustles with the activity of village life. People run alongside cars with baskets full to the brim with onions and potatoes to sell. Carpenters craft planks of wood into tables in the small town’s centre. Fig trees stand tall on either side of the hill, casting a welcoming shade from the hot East African sun. An assortment of onions, sweet potato, maize, banana, cassava, beans and cabbage are grown alongside coffee in the hill’s rich soils.

Gitwe carries deep scars from its violent past. Yet, there is an unrivalled unity amongst the people here. They have worked hard to develop as a community, coming together to build schools for their children and homes for their neighbours. With the help of Anicet and Patrice, the two coffee scouts dedicated to working on the hill, they are learning best farming practices. Before the scouts, farmers weren’t aware of the harm antestia bugs – the insect linked to the potato defect - could cause to their coffee. There was no one to show them how to prune their trees or explain why it was important. They didn’t know how to mulch or fertilize their farms. e scouts’ hard work has renewed farmers’ interest in growing coffee. Gitwe farmers are now pioneering a way of irrigating their coffee by building water channels alongside their farms. These channels collect rain water, which slowly irrigates their coffee trees and other crops. This is the second year in a row we have purchased coffee from Gitwe hill, but this year we have purchased both a washed and a natural processed lot. The washed process lot has a classic acidity-forward profile, typical of Burundi, with notes of gooseberry and redcurrant. This is rounded out by a honey sweetness, and a distinct rooibos tea finish.

Technical
Data

Producer Ben Carlson
Region Heza
Altitude 2000 masl
Varietals Bourbon
Process Natural
Harvest June 2018

Process
Washed

Natural processing is the original manner in which all coffee was previously processed. The cherries are dried with the seeds (also known as beans) inside, like drying a grape into a raisin. The seeds are dried with all of their layers intact, including the coffee cherry and mucilage. The coffee cherry and mucilage are composed of sugars and alcohols, which play a role in the sweetness, acidity and overall flavour profile of the coffee. The fruit is a closed environment, which encourages natural fermentation – helping create the final flavour profile. The fruit dries onto the parchment that surrounds the seeds.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Chemex

Espro press

Hario V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notifed with the release of new coffees.

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