Ethiopia

Elias Migu Natural

The natural process enhances a soft ripe fruit character in the cup, while maintaining clean bergamot floral notes.
  • Our second year working with Elias Migu in Yirgacheffe.
  • This lot consists of coffee only from Elias’ farm.
  • The natural process creates a heavy fruit-driven cup, a wilder expression of Ethiopia coffee.
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 250g (8.8oz).
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days | Espresso 14 days.

Expect notes of:

Bergamot

Strawberry

Hazelnut

Elias Migu Natural

This is our second year working with Tracon Trading Co, an exporter based in Addis, who also own 4 mills in the famous Yirgacheffe region. Tracon were one of the first to capitalise on the new smaller lot size allowed by the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange in 2017, by launching a single producer program for some of their producer partners with a large enough production to be processed and exported separately. This is therefore our second year purchasing coffee produced by Elias Migu through Tracon’s single producer program. Elias delivered his ripe cherries to the Tracon-owned Hafursa Waro processing station as he has in the past, but for the last two years his coffee was carefully tracked throughout processing, kept separate from cherry arriving from thousands of other smallholders. This new system allows much more traceability of the conditions under which the coffee was grown, picked and processed, allowing more feedback from buyer to farmer, and allows us to pay a premium to Elias for his hard work. We at La Cabra are excited to be a small part of this development in Ethiopia, and hope to see more traceability and transparency in the market over time.

This year for the first time, we are excited to present a natural lot purely composed of coffee grown on Elias’ 1.9 hectares of land. When the coffee arrived at the Hafursa Waro station, the cherries went directly to the raised drying beds to be dried. This lot took 17 days to dry, being turned often, with moisture content measured to ensure consistency. Often the cherries are protected from the hottest midday sun with tarps in order to slow down the drying. This careful processing produces a very clean coffee, with characteristic ‘natural’ soft fruit notes of strawberry and mango, while maintaining some bergamot florals in the aroma.

Being able to find this level of transparency and traceability in this iconic origin is still a new and exciting experience, and one we’re going to continue to explore here at La Cabra. Finding more direct relationships, experimenting with varietals and processing, and fostering mutually beneficial cooperation are our aims for the next few years. Keep an eye on our social media channels for more stories from our recent trip to Ethiopia, we are excited to taste the results from this years crop.

The Cooperative system

Ethiopia operates on a system similar to its neighbour Kenya, where small-holder farmers are often part of cooperatives, delivering their harvested cherries to wet mills owned by the cooperative to be processed. The cooperative pays a price to each farmer for their cherries, depending on the quality and quantity they delivered to the mill, and on the price they receive from green coffee buyers for the processed product. Cooperatives often employ a mill manager, a very important role, as they are ultimately responsible for the quality of the mill’s output. Their stewardship of coffee fermentation is a huge factor, but the quality of raw cherries arriving at the mill is also important to control. Careful sorting during fermentation stages can help, but often managers will reject damaged or unripe cherries before they even enter the mill. Many cooperatives also pool their resources to provide support to their members, such as visits from agronomists, and low interest loans for investment in farms.

Part of the reason Ethiopian coffees are so unique is the high level of biodiversity when compared to modern coffee production in most of the rest of the world. This is partly due to the wild forest system, and partly down to the genetic diversity of the coffee plants themselves. There are thousands of so far uncategorised ‘heirloom’ varieties growing in Ethiopia; all descended from wild cross pollination between species derived from the original Arabica trees. This biodiversity leads to hardier coffee plants, which don’t need to be artificially fertilised. This means that 95% of coffee production in Ethiopia is organic, although most small farmers and mills can’t afford to pay for certification, so can’t label their coffee as such. The absence of monoculture in the Ethiopian coffee lands also means plants are much less susceptible to the decimating effects of diseases such as leaf rust that have ripped through other producing countries.

Read more about growing coffee in Ethiopia:

Read more

About La Cabra

A focus on raw material

If we don’t feel that a coffee suits our style or what we like to present, we simply won’t buy it. Sometimes this leads to issues in green buying; we have to pay very close attention, to a level of green quality that will support this approach, and to how this will develop over the life of a coffee. We are required to focus heavily on the freshness of coffee, both green and roasted, to avoid introducing taints into our cups. We always use clean and fresh water, of an ideal mineral content to present the coffee in its best possible light. Once we have the correct roasting profile, water, and coffee age, the act of brewing is much more simple. A wide variance in brewing parameters can still produce delicious and transparent cups. It is also important to note that this is not always the most consistent approach. The coffee is laid completely bare, so any flaw with the raw material is clearly on show. We could often develop some coffees slightly more, to make them more approachable or easy to work with, but wavering from our philosophy like this would compromise our commitment to complete transparency in coffee.

Read more

Technical
Data

Producer Francisco Mena
Farm Sumava de Lourdes
Region West Valley
Altitude 1750 masl
Varietal Caturra
Process Natural
Harvest March 2019

Process
Natural

The natural, or dry process, is the traditional process, going back generations. When accomplished in a controlled and careful manner, dry processed coffees can produce flavour experiences not found in wet processed coffees, deep fruits and florals, normally with heavier mouthfeel and lower acidity. The cherries are first sorted, and then laid out on in thin layers (2-6 cm) on raised drying beds. These are almost always used for high quality naturals, as they aid airflow around the coffee as it dries, enabling more even drying. It is very important that coffees are sorted very carefully early on in the drying process, as all of the cherries quickly turn dark brown, making it impossible to separate under and overripe cherries. The cherries are turned frequently to avoid mold formation or over-fermentation, until they reach a moisture content of below 20%, and the outer cherry layer shrinks and blackens. This process takes between 2 and 4 weeks, depending on weather conditions.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Espresso

French-Press

V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notified with the release of new coffees.

Kr. 129,00



The natural process enhances a soft ripe fruit character in the cup, while maintaining clean bergamot floral notes.
  • Our second year working with Elias Migu in Yirgacheffe.
  • This lot consists of coffee only from Elias’ farm.
  • The natural process creates a heavy fruit-driven cup, a wilder expression of Ethiopia coffee.
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 250g (8.8oz).
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days | Espresso 14 days.

Expect notes of:

Bergamot

Strawberry

Hazelnut

Elias Migu Natural

This is our second year working with Tracon Trading Co, an exporter based in Addis, who also own 4 mills in the famous Yirgacheffe region. Tracon were one of the first to capitalise on the new smaller lot size allowed by the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange in 2017, by launching a single producer program for some of their producer partners with a large enough production to be processed and exported separately. This is therefore our second year purchasing coffee produced by Elias Migu through Tracon’s single producer program. Elias delivered his ripe cherries to the Tracon-owned Hafursa Waro processing station as he has in the past, but for the last two years his coffee was carefully tracked throughout processing, kept separate from cherry arriving from thousands of other smallholders. This new system allows much more traceability of the conditions under which the coffee was grown, picked and processed, allowing more feedback from buyer to farmer, and allows us to pay a premium to Elias for his hard work. We at La Cabra are excited to be a small part of this development in Ethiopia, and hope to see more traceability and transparency in the market over time.

This year for the first time, we are excited to present a natural lot purely composed of coffee grown on Elias’ 1.9 hectares of land. When the coffee arrived at the Hafursa Waro station, the cherries went directly to the raised drying beds to be dried. This lot took 17 days to dry, being turned often, with moisture content measured to ensure consistency. Often the cherries are protected from the hottest midday sun with tarps in order to slow down the drying. This careful processing produces a very clean coffee, with characteristic ‘natural’ soft fruit notes of strawberry and mango, while maintaining some bergamot florals in the aroma.

Being able to find this level of transparency and traceability in this iconic origin is still a new and exciting experience, and one we’re going to continue to explore here at La Cabra. Finding more direct relationships, experimenting with varietals and processing, and fostering mutually beneficial cooperation are our aims for the next few years. Keep an eye on our social media channels for more stories from our recent trip to Ethiopia, we are excited to taste the results from this years crop.

The Cooperative system

Ethiopia operates on a system similar to its neighbour Kenya, where small-holder farmers are often part of cooperatives, delivering their harvested cherries to wet mills owned by the cooperative to be processed. The cooperative pays a price to each farmer for their cherries, depending on the quality and quantity they delivered to the mill, and on the price they receive from green coffee buyers for the processed product. Cooperatives often employ a mill manager, a very important role, as they are ultimately responsible for the quality of the mill’s output. Their stewardship of coffee fermentation is a huge factor, but the quality of raw cherries arriving at the mill is also important to control. Careful sorting during fermentation stages can help, but often managers will reject damaged or unripe cherries before they even enter the mill. Many cooperatives also pool their resources to provide support to their members, such as visits from agronomists, and low interest loans for investment in farms.

Part of the reason Ethiopian coffees are so unique is the high level of biodiversity when compared to modern coffee production in most of the rest of the world. This is partly due to the wild forest system, and partly down to the genetic diversity of the coffee plants themselves. There are thousands of so far uncategorised ‘heirloom’ varieties growing in Ethiopia; all descended from wild cross pollination between species derived from the original Arabica trees. This biodiversity leads to hardier coffee plants, which don’t need to be artificially fertilised. This means that 95% of coffee production in Ethiopia is organic, although most small farmers and mills can’t afford to pay for certification, so can’t label their coffee as such. The absence of monoculture in the Ethiopian coffee lands also means plants are much less susceptible to the decimating effects of diseases such as leaf rust that have ripped through other producing countries.

Read more about growing coffee in Ethiopia:

Read more

About La Cabra

A focus on raw material

If we don’t feel that a coffee suits our style or what we like to present, we simply won’t buy it. Sometimes this leads to issues in green buying; we have to pay very close attention, to a level of green quality that will support this approach, and to how this will develop over the life of a coffee. We are required to focus heavily on the freshness of coffee, both green and roasted, to avoid introducing taints into our cups. We always use clean and fresh water, of an ideal mineral content to present the coffee in its best possible light. Once we have the correct roasting profile, water, and coffee age, the act of brewing is much more simple. A wide variance in brewing parameters can still produce delicious and transparent cups. It is also important to note that this is not always the most consistent approach. The coffee is laid completely bare, so any flaw with the raw material is clearly on show. We could often develop some coffees slightly more, to make them more approachable or easy to work with, but wavering from our philosophy like this would compromise our commitment to complete transparency in coffee.

Read more

Technical
Data

Producer Francisco Mena
Farm Sumava de Lourdes
Region West Valley
Altitude 1750 masl
Varietal Caturra
Process Natural
Harvest March 2019

Process
Natural

The natural, or dry process, is the traditional process, going back generations. When accomplished in a controlled and careful manner, dry processed coffees can produce flavour experiences not found in wet processed coffees, deep fruits and florals, normally with heavier mouthfeel and lower acidity. The cherries are first sorted, and then laid out on in thin layers (2-6 cm) on raised drying beds. These are almost always used for high quality naturals, as they aid airflow around the coffee as it dries, enabling more even drying. It is very important that coffees are sorted very carefully early on in the drying process, as all of the cherries quickly turn dark brown, making it impossible to separate under and overripe cherries. The cherries are turned frequently to avoid mold formation or over-fermentation, until they reach a moisture content of below 20%, and the outer cherry layer shrinks and blackens. This process takes between 2 and 4 weeks, depending on weather conditions.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Espresso

French-Press

V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notified with the release of new coffees.