Colombia

Alto Cielo

Soft blueberries and creamy milk chocolate are punctuated by a note of crisp quince tea in this elegant natural lot from Huila
  • Grown in the mountainous region of Huila, Colombia.
  • Rust resistant Tabi varietal brings fresh and juicy quality to the cup.
  • The natural process is seldom seen in Huila, but here brings a round blueberry character
  • Notes: Quince, Blueberry and Milk Chocolate
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 250g (8.8oz).
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days | Espresso 14 days.

Expect notes of:

Quince

Blueberry

Milk Chocolate

Angelo Sosa

Angelo Sosa grows coffee on a 10 hectare plot outside the city of Gigante in central Huila, Colombia. A rather large farm compared to most in Huila, Angelo picked this spot due to its natural beauty, due to the placement high above Gigante, on the slopes of the Eastern Andean Cordillera. The micro-climate here is also very suitable for the production of high-quality coffee, with cool humid evenings followed by days filled with plentiful and powerful sun, here only 250 km north of the equator. Angelo is a great fan of the Tabi varietal, both due to its disease resistance and high yield, but also due to the fact that it creates a much higher quality cup than more traditional Colombian hybrids. For these reasons he grows almost exclusively Tabi on Alto Cielo, which he has nicknamed ‘Tabiland’. Unusually for Huila, Angelo uses a natural process for this particular lot of Tabi. The cherries were pre-fermented in tanks for 24 hours, before being dried carefully under plastic canopies for around 16 days. These canopies provide protection from rains during harvest, but also raise the temperature inside and aid airflow to achieve even and controlled drying of naturals, even in this rather humid climate. Angelo was aided in creating this processing protocol by agronomists from InCoNexus, one of our export partners in Colombia. This process has unveiled a soft and elegant profile, with a creamy milk chocolate and blueberry character. The fresh character of the Tabi is however still present through a note of crisp quince tea.

Huila

Coffees grown in Huila are highly prized in our industry, for several reasons. The mountainous terrain provides high altitudes and varying microclimates, leading to a diverse flavour spectrum throughout the area. Diversity is also encouraged by the large number of small farms, with those averaging between 1 and 3 hectares producing much of the coffee in the region. The small farms here mainly have their own processing facilities, both wet mills, where the coffee is pulped, fermented and washed, and space for drying the coffees. Huila is particularly exciting for speciality coffee due to its plentiful high altitude. The Colombian Andes split into 3 distinct ranges here, the eastern, western and central ‘cordilleras’. Alto Cielo sits in the Gigante municipality, on the western slopes of the eastern cordillera, in central Huila. This high altitude leads to large day-night swings in temperature, which slows cherry maturation. Further down into the valley between the two cordilleras, lies a large area of jungle. Weather systems carry cool, moist air from the jungle up into the coffee growing lands, further lengthening the cherry maturation. All this leads to very intense, sweet and complex cups, but also to one of the main challenges of producing coffee in this region. The cool temperatures and high level of humidity mean that drying coffee can be a very difficult prospect here.

About La Cabra

A focus on raw material

If we don’t feel that a coffee suits our style or what we like to present, we simply won’t buy it. Sometimes this leads to issues in green buying; we have to pay very close attention, to a level of green quality that will support this approach, and to how this will develop over the life of a coffee. We are required to focus heavily on the freshness of coffee, both green and roasted, to avoid introducing taints into our cups. We always use clean and fresh water, of an ideal mineral content to present the coffee in its best possible light. Once we have the correct roasting profile, water, and coffee age, the act of brewing is much more simple. A wide variance in brewing parameters can still produce delicious and transparent cups. It is also important to note that this is not always the most consistent approach. The coffee is laid completely bare, so any flaw with the raw material is clearly on show. We could often develop some coffees slightly more, to make them more approachable or easy to work with, but wavering from our philosophy like this would compromise our commitment to complete transparency in coffee.

Read more

Technical
Data

Producer Angelo Sosa
Region Huila
Altitude 1800 masl
Varietal Tabi
Process Natural
Harvest November 2019

Process
Natural

The natural, or dry process, is the traditional process, going back generations. When accomplished in a controlled and careful manner, dry processed coffees can produce flavour experiences not found in wet processed coffees, deep fruits and florals, normally with heavier mouthfeel and lower acidity. The cherries are first sorted, and then laid out on in thin layers (2-6 cm) on raised drying beds. These are almost always used for high quality naturals, as they aid airflow around the coffee as it dries, enabling more even drying. It is very important that coffees are sorted very carefully early on in the drying process, as all of the cherries quickly turn dark brown, making it impossible to separate under and overripe cherries. The cherries are turned frequently to avoid mold formation or over-fermentation, until they reach a moisture content of below 20%, and the outer cherry layer shrinks and blackens. This process takes between 2 and 4 weeks, depending on weather conditions.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Espresso

French-Press

V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notified with the release of new coffees.

Kr. 149,00



Soft blueberries and creamy milk chocolate are punctuated by a note of crisp quince tea in this elegant natural lot from Huila
  • Grown in the mountainous region of Huila, Colombia.
  • Rust resistant Tabi varietal brings fresh and juicy quality to the cup.
  • The natural process is seldom seen in Huila, but here brings a round blueberry character
  • Notes: Quince, Blueberry and Milk Chocolate
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 250g (8.8oz).
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days | Espresso 14 days.

Expect notes of:

Quince

Blueberry

Milk Chocolate

Angelo Sosa

Angelo Sosa grows coffee on a 10 hectare plot outside the city of Gigante in central Huila, Colombia. A rather large farm compared to most in Huila, Angelo picked this spot due to its natural beauty, due to the placement high above Gigante, on the slopes of the Eastern Andean Cordillera. The micro-climate here is also very suitable for the production of high-quality coffee, with cool humid evenings followed by days filled with plentiful and powerful sun, here only 250 km north of the equator. Angelo is a great fan of the Tabi varietal, both due to its disease resistance and high yield, but also due to the fact that it creates a much higher quality cup than more traditional Colombian hybrids. For these reasons he grows almost exclusively Tabi on Alto Cielo, which he has nicknamed ‘Tabiland’. Unusually for Huila, Angelo uses a natural process for this particular lot of Tabi. The cherries were pre-fermented in tanks for 24 hours, before being dried carefully under plastic canopies for around 16 days. These canopies provide protection from rains during harvest, but also raise the temperature inside and aid airflow to achieve even and controlled drying of naturals, even in this rather humid climate. Angelo was aided in creating this processing protocol by agronomists from InCoNexus, one of our export partners in Colombia. This process has unveiled a soft and elegant profile, with a creamy milk chocolate and blueberry character. The fresh character of the Tabi is however still present through a note of crisp quince tea.

Huila

Coffees grown in Huila are highly prized in our industry, for several reasons. The mountainous terrain provides high altitudes and varying microclimates, leading to a diverse flavour spectrum throughout the area. Diversity is also encouraged by the large number of small farms, with those averaging between 1 and 3 hectares producing much of the coffee in the region. The small farms here mainly have their own processing facilities, both wet mills, where the coffee is pulped, fermented and washed, and space for drying the coffees. Huila is particularly exciting for speciality coffee due to its plentiful high altitude. The Colombian Andes split into 3 distinct ranges here, the eastern, western and central ‘cordilleras’. Alto Cielo sits in the Gigante municipality, on the western slopes of the eastern cordillera, in central Huila. This high altitude leads to large day-night swings in temperature, which slows cherry maturation. Further down into the valley between the two cordilleras, lies a large area of jungle. Weather systems carry cool, moist air from the jungle up into the coffee growing lands, further lengthening the cherry maturation. All this leads to very intense, sweet and complex cups, but also to one of the main challenges of producing coffee in this region. The cool temperatures and high level of humidity mean that drying coffee can be a very difficult prospect here.

About La Cabra

A focus on raw material

If we don’t feel that a coffee suits our style or what we like to present, we simply won’t buy it. Sometimes this leads to issues in green buying; we have to pay very close attention, to a level of green quality that will support this approach, and to how this will develop over the life of a coffee. We are required to focus heavily on the freshness of coffee, both green and roasted, to avoid introducing taints into our cups. We always use clean and fresh water, of an ideal mineral content to present the coffee in its best possible light. Once we have the correct roasting profile, water, and coffee age, the act of brewing is much more simple. A wide variance in brewing parameters can still produce delicious and transparent cups. It is also important to note that this is not always the most consistent approach. The coffee is laid completely bare, so any flaw with the raw material is clearly on show. We could often develop some coffees slightly more, to make them more approachable or easy to work with, but wavering from our philosophy like this would compromise our commitment to complete transparency in coffee.

Read more

Technical
Data

Producer Angelo Sosa
Region Huila
Altitude 1800 masl
Varietal Tabi
Process Natural
Harvest November 2019

Process
Natural

The natural, or dry process, is the traditional process, going back generations. When accomplished in a controlled and careful manner, dry processed coffees can produce flavour experiences not found in wet processed coffees, deep fruits and florals, normally with heavier mouthfeel and lower acidity. The cherries are first sorted, and then laid out on in thin layers (2-6 cm) on raised drying beds. These are almost always used for high quality naturals, as they aid airflow around the coffee as it dries, enabling more even drying. It is very important that coffees are sorted very carefully early on in the drying process, as all of the cherries quickly turn dark brown, making it impossible to separate under and overripe cherries. The cherries are turned frequently to avoid mold formation or over-fermentation, until they reach a moisture content of below 20%, and the outer cherry layer shrinks and blackens. This process takes between 2 and 4 weeks, depending on weather conditions.

La Cabra

Brew Guides

You can brew our coffees any way you want it is just a matter of the right ratios.

Espresso

French-Press

V60

Aeropress

Get notified

Sign up to our email service to get notified with the release of new coffees.

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