Gesha Village

Wild complexity

In the high altitude humid forests, thought to be the birthplace of Arabica coffee, lies Gesha Village where one varietal sits in the spotlight; Geisha.

Gesha Village

Fell in love

Gesha Village lies in the Bench Maji zone of South Western Ethiopia, not far from the border with South Sudan. This area, in the high altitude humid forests where the Great Rift Valley passes into South Sudan, is thought to be the birthplace of Arabica coffee, and is still home to great genetic diversity. Here at Gesha Village however, one varietal sits in the spotlight; Geisha. Adam Overton and Rachel Samuel first travelled to Ethiopia in 2007 to make a documentary about its unique method of coffee production, and fell in love with the country. They decided during that short trip that they would eventually move to the country to start producing coffee themselves. They found a 471 hectare plot of land in Bench Maji, further west than we normally find specialty coffee in Ethiopia, in a remote area of untouched high altitude forest. The wild forest remained as coffee was planted, maintaining as much as possible of the biodiversity so crucial to the Ethiopian mode of production, while also providing ample shade for the fragile Geisha trees.

When preparing Gesha Village, the team trekked into the forest and gathered seeds from the wild coffee trees, selecting those that genetically resembled the original 1931 expedition Geisha.

Geisha

This isn’t just any Geisha however. Gesha Village is located only around 20 km from the Gori Gesha forest, where the hallowed varietal of the same name was first isolated by British researchers in 1931. When preparing Gesha Village, the team behind the project trekked into the forest and gathered seeds from the wild coffee trees growing there, selecting those that genetically resembled the original 1931 expedition Geisha.

See coffees

Gesha Village

Narsha

A highly controlled natural process enhances complexity and mouthfeel in this delicately balanced Gesha lot.
  • Out now.
  • The Gesha 1931 varietal was selected for its similarity to the Panamanian Geisha strain.
  • The natural process adds rich complexity to the floral and fresh character Geisha coffees are known for.
  • Look for: Jasmine, Peach and Tangerine.
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 150g (5.3oz).
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days.
Kr. 209,00
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Gesha Village

Bangi

An innovative Semi-Carbonic Maceration adds wild tropical fruit character to this floral and fresh raw material from Gesha Village.
  • Released: 6th of December 2 PM CET (14:00).
  • The Gori Gesha varietal was selected from the forest of the same name.
  • The innovative processing adds wild complexity to the floral and fresh character Geisha coffees are known for.
  • Look for: Bergamot, Mango and Strawberry.
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 100g (3.5oz)
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days
Kr. 219,00
Coming Soon Learn more

Gesha Village

Oma

An innovative fully Carbonic Maceration adds clean ripe fruit character to this floral and fresh raw material from Gesha Village.
  • Released: 6th of December 2 PM CET (14:00).
  • The Gesha 1931 varietal was selected for its similarity to the Panamanian Geisha strain.
  • The innovative processing adds ripe fruit complexity to the floral and fresh character Geisha coffees are known for.
  • Look for: Violet, Lychee and Strawberry.
  • Whole Bean Coffee: 100g (3.5oz)
  • Minimum resting period: Filter 7 days
Kr. 229,00
Coming Soon Learn more

Guide

How to brew Gesha Village

To get the best out of these coffees from Gesha Village, as with the rest of our coffees, we follow a few simple principles. Our approach to coffee brewing at home is rather straightforward, not focussing too much on endless small adjustments and tweaking. Using fresh clean water, with an appropriate mineral content, and resting the coffee after roast are the most important factors; once you have these under control, you can begin brewing transparent and clean cups at home. You can pull out that final little sparkle from a coffee by brewing carefully and evenly, and grinding correctly for the chosen brew method.

Water

Probably the most important factor in brewing is using clean water, of an appropriate mineral content. Water makes up the vast majority of our coffee, so makes a huge difference to all aspects of the final character of the brew. Off-flavours in water (such as chlorine) can make it into the cup, but even more importantly, the balance and level of water’s mineral content dictate what we are able to extract from a coffee. Dissolved minerals in water exist as charged ions, which bind to the flavour compounds in coffee, extracting them into the cup. Each type of mineral has a different influence on the cup, so a balanced mineral content will lead to balanced final cups. For home brewing we recommend the Peak Water filter. The precision with which it is able to create clean water with an ideal mineral balance for coffee makes it one of the most vital pieces of equipment for home brewing that we know of.
Peak Water filter

Resting

We also recommend resting your coffee after roasting. When coffee is roasted, chemical changes in the beans take place, and one of the by-products of these changes is carbon dioxide gas. This gas becomes trapped in the bean cell structure, and slowly seeps out over time. This makes it difficult to brew clean cups, by fizzing out as you attempt to brew coffee, and by dissolving into carbonic acid during brewing, causing off-flavours in the cup. As a general guide, we wouldn’t even try to brew a coffee that’s less than 7-10 days from roast, and we’d strongly recommend keeping some coffee and experimenting with how much coffees open up at 6 weeks and beyond. This is true especially with very high quality raw material such as that from Gesha Village.
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Grind

Grinding the coffee correctly for the chosen brew method and contact time is important in order to control the amount that we extract from the coffee. Grinding finer will extract more, while grinding coarser will extract less. As a general rule, if you extract too much from a coffee, it will taste dry and bitter, and if you extract too little, the coffee will taste thin and sour. By tasting every cup you brew with a critical palette, and changing the grind size accordingly, you’ll make sure to brew transparent and delicious brews.
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Bundles

Save up to 14% on bundles

2 x 250g & 1 x 150g Bundle

Brand New

Just added to our collection

1st: Narsha / Ethiopia

Look for: Jasmine, Peach and Tangerine

2nd: Fazenda Estiva / Brazil

Look for: Chocolate, Almond and Cherry

3th: Oreti AB / Kenya

Look for: Rhubarb, Blackcurrant and Gooseberry

Kr. 414,00

Kr. 461,00 | Save 10%

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1 x 150g + 2 x 100g Bundle

Gesha Village Collection

Wild complexity all in one bundle
Kr. 565,00

Kr. 657,00 | Save 14%

Launching December 6

This incredible raw material, grown in its native wild forest, combined with careful processing, creates wild complexity.